COMMITTEES

United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development UNCSTD

GROUP: ECOSOC

usg.ecosoc@munuc.org

  • Topic A: Equitable Access to Cancer Research
  • Topic B: Intellectual Property of Public Health

TOPIC A Equitable Access to Cancer Research

TOPIC B Intellectual Property of Public Health

EXECUTIVES

  • Emily Gamboa (she/they)
Email Committee Chair

The United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development (UNSTD) promotes discourse on emerging scientific and technological discoveries and their implications on global development and sustainability. In particular, this committee will focus on assisting developing countries to benefit from the use of science, technology, and innovation to address their own development challenges. Fulfilling this goal entails concrete collaboration between member states, NGOs, other UN bodies, and civil society representatives in the scientific community to create lasting and effective policy changes.

Topic A: Equitable Access to Cancer Research
As developing countries implement infrastructure to support scientific inquiry and innovation, research collaboration with the rest of the international scientific community is severely lacking. More specifically, research and development of cancer therapeutics has been largely concentrated in much wealthier nations. However, with an increase in urban development and economic diversification in these least-developed countries (LDCs), the risk of developing cancer in these populations must be called into attention. Delegates will have to navigate how to best support LDCs in pursuing cancer research within their own communities.

Topic B: Intellectual Property of Public Health
Intellectual property is the development of ideas, inventions, designs, and methods for commercial use. This can have great implications for the way that novel medical technologies, drugs, and healthcare infrastructures are distributed across the globe, given that such property may limit the availability of these resources in certain regions. More than ever is there a demand to ensure equity in public health all around the globe, especially in least-developed countries (LCDs). Medical technology and pharmaceutical companies currently find themselves at odds with the demands of the government public health sector, coupled with the novel discoveries led by academic and commercial labs worldwide. Delegates will be challenged with how to best protect intellectual property of commercial health industries while at the same time assisting LDCs in making use of such intellectual property to improve public health within their own communities.